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queried 300 times. if they need a warrant to get content, that's sent to the f.b.i., and the f.b.i. gets a court warrant before any content of any conversation is looked at. >> schieffer: all right, well, senator, thank you so much for coming. we're going to come back in a minute. we'll talk to two more senators about this and about
largest serving fbi director in history. this hearing is about 2.5 hours. >> good morning. toda today, the judiciary committee welcomes robert mueller for what is likely to be his final appearance before this panel as director of the federal bureau of investigation (fbi). director mueller began as head of the fbi just days before the terrorist attacks of september 11, 2001. for nearly 12 years, he has led the bureau as it has shifted its primary focus to national security and counterterrorism efforts, while still carrying on its historic mission of fighting crime. that transition, while important for our national security, has not been without problems. from national security letters to the latest revelations about the use of the patriot act, i remain concerned that we have not yet struck the right balance between the intelligence- gathering needs of the fbi, and the civil liberties and privacy rights of americans. i also want to make sure that the shift in the fbi's focus does not unduly hamper the bureau's ability to investigate cases involving fraud and violent crime that significa
protection program. then, outgoing fbi director robert mueller on operations at his department. after that, senate debate on an immigration bill amendment that would put 20,000 patrol officers on the u.s./mexico border. >> tuesday, the senate banking committee examines private student loans and how they're regulated. the committee will hear from fdic, federal reserve and office of the comptroller of currency. live at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> tuesday president obama delivers a major speech on his plan to tackle climate change. he'll announce executive orders to direct federal agencies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change. live coverage from georgetown university, 1:35 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy events and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our scheduled toes at our web sites, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> next, a discu
editor, yuval levin sunday on c- span's "q & a." >> president obama nominated the fbi.ey as head of from the white house, this is just over 10 minutes. Ï»¿ >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states, accompanied by mr. bob mueller and mr. jim comey. >> good afternoon, everybody. please have a seat. for more than a century, we have counted on the dedicated men and women of the fbi to keep us safe. in that time, the fbi has been led by six directors and the second longest serving director of the fbi, for the last 12 years, an exemplary public servant, bob mueller. by law fbi directors only serve for 10 years, but back in 2011, when bob's term was up, i asked congress to give him two more years. it was not a request i made lightly, and i know congress did not grant it lightly, but at the time transitions were underway at the cia and the pentagon, and given the threats facing our nation, it was critical to have bob's strong leadership at the bureau. 12 years is a long time to do anything. and i guarantee you that bob's wife agrees. in addition to asking congress, we need
the fbi, the white house going with the man who has a story they believe ey can sell to the senate in the confirmation process. president obama: the key moments when it mattered most he joined bob standing up in what he believed was right prepared to give up the job he loves rather than being a parof something he felt was fundamentally wrong. we know the rule ofaw sets the nation apart and is its foundation. lou: president obama referring to an incident in 2004 when he was filling in for a severely ill attorney general john ashcroft. while he was hospitalized, he refused to reauthorize the controversial eavesdropping progm implemented after september 11. while citing concerns over its legality. but the prinpal hero in the instant certainly was a man hated and reviled by most of the left. the refusal chief of staff and white hous counsel gonzales tried to make an endun. going to the hospital bed trying to pressure him into overruling his deputy. he refused to do so. and the next day president george w. bush agreed to change the program amid the department of justice's concern over l
bodies from the water. an alert went out to the fbi. jim kallstrom believed the news was about to get worse. >> i would have bet my government paycheck it was an act of terrorism. >> reporter: believing the nation had just been attacked, an investigation is launched unprecedented in the history of u.s. air travel. coming up, it is a mystery in a million pieces, with clues scattered for miles at the bottom of the ocean. the white house demands answers, and gets ready to retaliate. [ male announcer ] away... [ children laughing ] ♪ ...is the smell of salt in the air. ♪ it's the sound a seashell makes. [ seagulls calling ] away...is a place that's beyond your imagination, yet well within your means. find your away. for a dealer and the rv that's right for you, visit gorving.com. >>> the plane was in over a million pieces. a million pieces. >> reporter: the fbi's jim kallstrom arrived at dawn the next day, facing the toughest case of his career. convinced the crash of twa flight 800 was an act of terrorism. >> if it was, then the crime scene really was all of long island and a good po
to be in hong kong. the fbi is asking hong kong to extradite him. james comey, nominated now by president obama to be the new fbi director. he's got a lot of cred, a lot of status here on capitol hill because of his previous activity to oppose unwarranted surveillance, which could help president obama win senate approval for the man he wants to be the fbi director. he calls himself a freakishly tall republican. he was deputy attorney general, an executive at lockheed martin, now president obama's nominee to direct the fbi. >> i'm not sure i have the words to describe how excited i am to return to the department of justice, and especially to get to work again with the people of the fbi. they are men and women who have devoted their lives to serving and protecting others. >> reporter: he would take over the bureau just after americans learned their phone and internet use might be monitored by the nsa. the outgoing director revealed the fbi is using drones for domestic surveillance. as acting attorney general in 2004, in a confrontation with seener bush 43 white house officials, he challenged the
and fbi were hiding in the brush, beside and below the river bridges. this was to be the last night, almost the last hour. >> i heard the splash. >> bob campbell, a police recruit, jumped to his feet down beside the chatahoochie river. he looked up at the bridge. >> i saw the brake lights of a car come on, i saw red lights. the car started slowly moving away from me across the bridge. >> campbell radioed the other team members up above him. >> i asked, did a car stop on the bridge? i couldn't believe what i saw. each person told me they didn't see it. >> then a policeman in a chase car hidden on the other side came on the radio. >> he just said the car is pulling in the parking lot here turning around in front of me, started coming back across the bridge, coming back in my direction. >> this is that white station wagon. police followed it and stopped it nearby. fbi agent mike pacombis rushed to the scene. the driver was standing by the highway. >> he was talking with the officers. saw a black male. he had on a baseball hat, had on glasses. >> the young man was wayne williams, about
-span. tonight on c-span, president obama nominates james comey as fbi director. later, discussion of nsa data collection programs and technology and privacy laws. today, president obama nominated as the next director of the fbi. he served as deputy attorney general under president bush and would replace fbi director mueller if confirmed. from the white house, this is just under 10 minutes. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states, accompanied by mr. bob mueller and mr. jim comey. >> good afternoon, everybody. please have a seat. for more than a century, we have counted on the dedicated men and women of the fbi to keep us safe. in that time, the fbi has been led by six directors and the second longest serving director of the fbi, for the last 12 years, an exemplary public servant, bob mueller. by law fbi directors only serve for 10 years, but back in 2011, when bob's term was up, i asked congress to give him two more years. it was not a request i made lightly, and i know congress did not grant it lightly, but at the time transitions were underway at the cia and the pentagon,
financial security data mining is. the senator points so we already have so much stated that the fbi misses. >> we can't seem to keep up with the people we have been told about. the underwear bomber. his dad turned demand. we cannot keep up with them. he got on a plane. they think somehow there will go through billions of bits of information every day. john: was your answer to that? >> here is a glorious thing. we're not going through these billions of things every day. the collection of phone records that edward snowden has talked about is not being used for data mining. there being used when they're is a specific terrorist case that we can identify and say, we think we have information that leads us to want to get checked these phone records. it is not the case that we're constantly data mining. very specific uses of information with approval by the fisa court. i guess my last thought is this, no program is going to catch them all. there is no way you can ever create a perfect system and cash every single incidents of terrorism, but thess programs have been important and effective and are
>> it is meant very sincerely. i have watched you over the years. i have watched the fbi do their job. in many ways, people don't even know about it. it is a thankless job in many ways. you have given almost 12 years of your life to this type of work. i want to personally tell you how much i personally appreciate you and the fbi and those who have served over the years. i wish you the very best when you do hang it up here. i think all of us -- i just think that you are truthful. and i won't take any more time. but i just wanted to make sure that i let you know just how deeply i feel towards you and those in the fbi who have been doing such a great job. >> thank you very much, senator. i have been very lucky and fortunate to have the opportunity to do this job. i have loved and enjoyed it. i thank you for the comment. >> you have done a great job. >> thank you very much, senator hatch. senator klobuchar is next. i do not see her. senator franken, he is not here. senator sessions? .. i want to join in my comments in that regard. there are so many things that are happening no
is there is an application that is made by the fbi under the statute to the fisa court. this is the fisc. they asked for and received permission to get records that are relevant to a national security investigation. they must demonstrate that it will be operated under the guidelines that are set forth by the attorney general under executive order 12333. it is limited to tangible objects. what does that mean? these are like records. like metadata, the phone data i've been describing, but limited to things you could get with a grand jury subpoena, those kinds of records. it is important to note prosecutors issue subpoenas all the time and do not need any involvement of a court or anybody else to do so. under this program, we need to get permission from the court to issue this ahead of time so there is court involvement with the issuance of these orders from a which is different from a grand jury subpoena, but the type of records, just documents, business records, things like that are limited to those same types of records we could get through a grand jury subpoena. now, the orders that we get last 90
and what does sah think about that? >> and does the fbi own or currently use drones and if , for what purse? >> yes, and for surveillance. >> talk about shock and a we. fbi using dron to spy on americans. now the governor weighs in and reaction from my shocking interview with father of whistle blower mr. snowden. anwhat he said wl shock you. cashin' in blowing the whistle on big brother right now. >> hi, everyone. i am eric poling. we'll be going full speed a head anexplore the latest in washington. and also colonel allen west is here. joining me in the hot seat good friend fox news contributor sarah pin. governor, welcome. we c't trust the irs. they proved tt by targeting conservatives. and they are giving union employees 70 million in bous paid for by the taxpayer it is not sitting well with you. >> no only a government would collect a bad deed. its a shame and more reasonto distrust our feder government and the nonsee going on in d.c. >> that's the overriding theme of the she. and can we trust them in governor, can we trust them? >> well,l, can i trust our fedel government? is the bear c
? >> and does the f.b.i. owner currently use drones and if so for what purpose? >> yes, sir and for surveillance. >> eric: shock and awe. now, they are using them to spy on americans. now, your privacy on the line. and reaction from a shocking exclusive interview with the father of the nsa whistleblower ed snowden. he is fired up and what he says will shock you. "cashin' in" blowing the whistle on big brother right now. >> eric: i'm eric boling. in a moment we'll explore the latest with "cashin' in" crew and joining us will be colonel alan west. joining me my very good friend and fox news contributor, sarah palin. governor, welcome. we obviously can't trust the irs. they proved that by targeting conservatives and now the agency is giving their union employees $70 million paid for by the temperature. it can't be sitting well with you? >> no, it certainly doesn't. i think in orwellian government be so generously rewarded. it's more reason to distrust our federal government and nonsense that is going in washington, d.c.. >> eric: that is the overriding theme of this show. can we trust them. governo
that killed more than 200 people was no accident. coming up, i'll take to the man who led the fbi investigation. and nik wallenda is set to walk across the grand canyon tomorrow. i'll show you how he's preparing for his more daring -- maybe this is the most daring high wire stunt he's ever done. [ female announcer ] think all pads are the same? don't. [ woman ] the technology in these pads... best creation ever! [ female announcer ] always infinity. invented with mind-blowing foam so incredibly thin, you'll be surprised it's up to 55% more absorbent. genius. always infinity. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can
was behind the targeting of conservative groups. f.b.i. investigators haven't spoken to any of the victims. let's bring in our political panel. ford oh comp and chris kathena former chief of staff for john manchin. gentlemen, good morning. >> they are wondering who was targeting. how high did it go up and will we ever know for sure? >> all the evidence to this point suggests that there were obviously agents in cincinnati, other officials in washington that were involved in terms of suggestions that this was directed by the white house, there is no evidence to suggest that. i do think we'll find out. an investigation like this tend to be slow and laborious. it's not at nice thing but i think it's the unfortunate reality how washington works. at the end of the day there are too many interests involved and too political as it already had s trying to get to the truth of what really happened. >> jamie: one thing you are saying to us, chris, is there was any vosm in the white house. ford, this is a big stunning to people that hear it. the number of visits that the director and chief of staff vis
passed the senate with bipartisan support. nancy cordes on what this means. a former f.b.i. agent testifies that he took bribes from boston mobster james "whitey" bulger. bulger had a few choice words of his own. don dahler was in the courthouse. major garrett breaks news with the president in the hunt for the man revealing america's secrets. >> reporter: mr. president, will you use u.s. military assets to in any way intercept mr. snowden? >> pelley: and paul lopez put his life on hold to fight for his country. carter evans reports 69 years later he's gone back in time to live his dream. captioning sponsored by captioning sponsored by cbs with scott p this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. >> pelley: good evening. a nation of immigrants tonight is one step closer to creating a path to citizenship for 11 million immigrants who are living here illegally. the senate this afternoon approved a sweeping overhaul of immigration laws. by a vote of 68-32. 14 republicans joined every democrat in voting yes. in addition to offering the hope of citizenship,
was being investigated by the fbi. we'll come back and talk about that. ♪ ♪ would you go back to when you got that less than amazing policy and go with esurance instead? well, they do have tools like coverage counselor to help you choose the coverage that fits you. it's like insurance from the future. actually, more like insurance for the modern world. thank you! esurance. now backed by allstate. click or call. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> cenk: all right michael hastings passed away recently. he was 33 years old. one of the best reporters in the country. one of the best investigative journalists. he died in a car crash. a lot of people have been asking about that crash. it was fiery the engine was thrown 100 yards, he said. what is compounding the question is an e-mail that michael sent shortly before his death. john has more on that. >> so as cenk said just a few hours before his death at 1:00 a.m. on monday, hastings sent an e-mail to his colleagues at buzzfeed. a friend of his from afghanistan, staff sergeant joseph biggs and. this is how it reads: >> as we m
flight 800. everyone died. people thought terrorism immediately and an alert went out to the fbi. the navy sent state-of-the-art salvage ships. investigators ended up recovering 97.5% of the plane. in a giant hangar they actually put twa flight 800 back together and reconstructed the plane's last seconds. early on they determined the center fuel tank blew up, causing the nose and first class section of the jet to break off and fall away. incredibly, the coach section kept flying for about 30 more seconds. evidence pointed not to one explosion but two. the second blast half a minute after the first erupted when the left wing tore away from the back half of the plane, leaking fuel from the much larger wing tank until something touched off a spark. that, they say, is why people saw a line of flames shooting upward. those eyewitness accounts of a trail of fire hit the internet less than 36 hours after the explosion. people speculated it was a terrorist surface-to-air missile. then a document began circulating on the web, taking the missile theory in a new direction. it said a u.s. na
points out we have so much data the fbi mrs. tips like the boston marathon bombers and other. >> we cannot keep up with the people we have been told about remember the underwear bomber? his dad turned him in andy thinks of how they will go through billions of bits of information everyday? john: what is your answer? >> we're not going through these every day. the collection of the phone records have not been used for data mining but if there is a specific terrorist case we can identify to say we have information to you checked the phone records records, it is not a case to constantly data mind they are a specific uses it is a program of their kitchens would expect. no program will katchis all. i will catch every single instance of terrorism but they have an important and effective and are critical to rounding out the nation's apparatus. john: thank you congressman. coming up, libertarians are mad at me and some call me disgusting and calmly a libertarian in name only but the government intrusion i really am about the irs that has the wrong ideas. >> wired they in my kitchen? >> conse
comey as the director of the f.b.i. he served deputy attorney general under president george w. bush. from the white house, this is ust over 10 minutes. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states, accompanied by mr. bob mueller and mr. jim comey. >> good afternoon, everybody. these have a seat. for more than a century, we have counted on the dedicated men and women of the fbi to keep us safe. in that time, the fbi has been led by six directors and the second longest serving director of the fbi, for the last 12 years, an exemplary public ervant, bob mueller. by law fbi directors only serve for 10 years, but back in 2011, when bob's term was up, i asked congress to give him two more years. it was not a request i made lightly, and i know congress did not grant it lightly, but at the time transitions were underway at the cia and the pentagon, and given the threats facing our nation, it was critical to have bob's strong leadership at the bureau. 12 years is a long time to do anything. and i guarantee you that bob's wife agrees. in addition to asking congress, we need appr
interview but not helping her cause. we'll show you why. >> do you know where your car is tonight? new fbi numbers are showing cars are disappearing across the bay area. the five cities that top the list. which ones and what you need to watch out for. >>> what can you do to prevent it? the fbi is calling it an epidemic. car thefts, cars are disappearing in record numbers. we have the new information about this wide-spread problem, george? >> reporter: well, raj, last year was a pretty rough year for autos around the bay area. cars are being stolen from the curb, driveways and parking lots like this one in san jose and tonight we talk to one woman whose christmas day was ruined because someone stole her car. >> the car was gone. it was just gone. >> reporter: margaret knows what it's like to have her car stolen. it happened to her on christmas day last year. >> around 10:0 0 in the morning i went out to get presents to put them under the tree and the car was gone. >> reporter: the presents in the trunk and her cd collection gone. >> it's really sort of a stunned feeling. >> reporter: she wa
mcdermott is upset over this fbi ad shows the mugshot of international terrorists. he says the poster is racist and offensive to muslims. we will deeted bait that in a second. what's clearly offensive is what defense secretary chuck hagel said this week that the university of nebraska at omaha. >> okay. so who has a way up in the back there? you are not a member of the taliban, are you? >> mr. secretary, i'm robin grande, an assistant professor at uno. >> laura: whoops? that professor was of indian dissent. joining us from dallas the president of the america together foundation. so, mr. gowts, why has this the there not been any outrage about secretary hagel's remark there? that was pretty interesting. >> it should have. and by the way i'm an indian too and it was very offensive remark as if he is calling me taliban there should have been outrage. i'm glad you are taking this up, laura. people should ask him to take that statement back. >> laura: i think, mr. ghouse probably if a republican tea party type guy had said that, there would be candlelight vigils now outside of his house or
in exchange for limited access in the use of the airfield. we suggested in our fri for the the fbi headquarters to explore the possibility of exchanging the existing fbi headquarters, which a long-term meets the needs of the fbi, for a new fbi headquarters or part of a new fbi headquarters that does actually meet the needs and would be more effective and sustainable financially and environmentally for managing the property of the fbi. we have a number of authorities that if we work closely with congress, maybe we can move on the margins or of these properties out, create better incentives for the agency to participate and give us room to have the conversations we need to have between the two branches of congress and the administration to push for was some kind of the deflation to make our asset disposal process more efficient. over, if youurn it are confirmed, the month after you are confirmed, i want you to come over and sit down with dr. coburn and myself. in the cigarette will we can do. i appreciate what you are trying to do on your own authority. but what we can do to enhance
of time weird little from the federal government. '60s, bill roemer and intelligence squad from the fbi began activity as a result of mcclellan and the committee hearings here in chicago. the outfit was involved in a lot of heroin distribution. so slowly but surely the federal government started to get in, but not the fbi. well, to some extent, to a limited extent. and i believe it's because j. edgar hoover was afraid to attack the mobs in the major cities because they were all integrated into the political structure. so if he was to attack the outfit in chicago, it would've been attacking -- anti-work for democratic presidents will wouldn't have worked. so the federal government under ronald reagan passed the rico laws. we so much about the racketeering laws. racketeering laws were passed in 1970 but it wasn't until 1990, 20 years later, that the fbi in chicago at the first rico investigation. why? i don't know. it's a difficult law. people have to learn how to use it. when william webster became the director of the fbi, their mission change. webster more or less realigned them instead
whitey bulger and a corrupt fbi agent bubbled up in court thursday. prosecutors complained that bulger cullalled their star witness a a, quote, blanking liar during testimony. the witness is john morris, a disgraced former fbi supervisor. he admits taking cash and wine from bulger while bulger worked as an informant on the italian mob. rikki klieman is a cbs news analyst. good morning. there's quite a history between these two guys. what exactly is the connection? >> well the history is really bad blood. there's no one that whitey bulger hates more. whitey bulger has been clear since the day he was captured in letters as well as in statements that he things morris should be in prison. for any of us who have followed this case from the very beginning, and i'm going back into the '70s, the '80s and when whitey became a fugitive in the '90s, if there is anybody who ought to be in prison above them all, i say it's john morris. >> explain for everybody who's not following it as closely this fbi agent, morris what he was doing. he was getting cases of wine with cash at
asinates james fbi director then mitch mcconnell talks about free speech under the obama administration. later, a discussion on nsa data collection and privacy laws. tomorrow on "washington journal ," the federal reserve's plan for stimulus programs with anthony sanders of george mason. tolowed by issues important younger americans including student loan interest rates and youth unemployment. we are joined by matthew segal. they use a photo database of almost 120 million people to and we willpects talk to the national reporter. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> this is a challenging time for people who are conservative. we have a quite liberal democratic president who has not only been elected but reelected after putting in place some ideas and programs and projects that, i think, are very wrongheaded. they had a chance to think about that and they reelected him. it's a challenging time. .t's also an exciting time what we're trying to do is modernize conservativism and and bring it in line with what the country is facing now to help the country and conservatives
's an fbi agent, he figures things out. hey. what's going on? fbi work. does this fbi work have anything to do with pelant? pelant-- he doesn't exist. no, we're looking at a killing done by an individual who manifests a malignant antisocial personality disorder. it helps to pull up old cases to compare, that's all. thank you for the insight. i run the major crimes here, and i'm investigating one, so... caroline: i'd hate to have to drop a report on the h.e.'s desk that you were getting in the way. that sort of politics appalls me. fine. seeley, run your investigation. it's just that, if i were you, i'd want all the help that i could get. but i'm not you. i did some reconstructions. wow, three sets. yeah, since there's no mandible, there's just an element of uncertainty here. brennan: these lesions on the scapula are most likely the remnants of a case of cutaneous leishmaniasis. saroyan: well, that's not a domestic disease. but i've seen it on soldiers. the troops in iraq get it from sand flea bites. montenegro: oh, well, that makes sense. hodgins thinks the metal fragments you gave him a
: some do. the f.b.i. data base and the state level of criminal justice data bases are becoming slowly interoperable. the department of defense which is mainly iraqi and afghan men collected during war segget. that can be queried at the same time you do the f.b.i. so the sort of connections growing among them. but not yet one big organism yet. the thing if you're concerned about this is there's a pretty good chance i have access to the f.b.i. data base, i have access to the department of defense, i probably have access to any state data base. and if there's a big enough case i can probably get in the state department too. our first call comes from rhode island on our line for independents. caller: thanks for taking my call. i just wanted to ask the gentleman about the boston bombing suspects, they had the videos of them. so i'm just curious if any kind of facial recognition was used. because i know they were asking the public more to identify them. so i'm wondering if they used this technology in any way to figure out who those guys were at that point. guest: thanks for the call. the s
as president obama nominated a new fbi directors. why those spy strategies are facing tough scrutiny. >> reporter: president obama has chosen james come as his nominee to become the next fbi director. he is known for blocking a reauthorization of a warrantless wiretapping program in 2004. >> we aren't judged solely by how many criminal wes bring to justice. we're judged by our commitment to the discussion. >> reporter: his nomination comes as more questions are being asked about recently leaked nsa surveillance programs. just this week current fbi director testified the bureau has used some drones for surveillance on u.s. soil. including an operation in alabama during a hostage situation. it's fuel for confirmation questions about how he will handle current high profile fbi investigations. >> i think he'll get through. the administration is going to have to give a lot of information. >> reporter: president obama is being asked about the nsa's domestic surveillance. >> these are issues that are extremely important. they go beyond the kinds of disclosures we've had recently. but go to
of the n.s.a. and the f.b.i. and the justice department. you had the director of national intelligence. office there. they laid out in great detail their case for why this surveillance program is important. and the interesting thing is there wasn't one member of congress in spite of all this controversy, there wasn't one member of congress that really stood up and gave them a hard time. so i think from that point of view, this was actually a good week for the administration. gwen: where is the president in this argument? of course he's defending himself to angela merkel, friend in germany. other than that is it more credible for the white house to leave it to the f.b.i., the n.s.a., the guys with the fruit on their shoulders when -- >> in the aftermath of the i.r.s. scandal, the benghazi scandal, i think this administration is grateful to have a scandal that is not breaking out along partisan lines. so i think -- gwen: yeah. >> let it be at that. gwen: the guys in uniform and be done with it. >> the president in the rose garden introduced jim colme, as his choice for the new f.b.i. dir
will do something about this? >> particularly in light of the fbi's response. just a week and a half ago, i asked the director of the fbi, who is heading up the investigation? you would think something of this magnitude. he didn't know. he didn't know how many people on the case. something of this concern to the united states, you would put your best lawyer, best investigative team. >> how about just anybody? >> he couldn't tell me, which underscores the lack of focus and priority that this must have at the fbi. what scares me more about this than anything else. the same fbi visited tea party people last year and the year before when they were applying for the tax exempt status. that's an irs question. what's the fbi doing showing up at people's door, applying for tax exempt status. when in america did you get a friendly visit from the local fbi agent when you were simply saying i want to apply for tax exempt status. chilling and scary as it gets. >> that proves my point more. time for a special prosecutor. the attorney general, boss of the fbi, apparently look wheat happening, nothing.
of the possibility it was a terrorist attack, the f.b.i. joined the ntsb and investigating the crash. 16 months later, the f.b.i. determined it was not a criminal act and four years after the accident, the ntsb released its conclusion. flight 800 blew up because of faulty wires, sparking vapors in the center fuel tank. >> there was grass mismanagement of the evidence -- gross mismanagement of the evidence and other facts that should have been appropriately considered and they weren't by either the f.b.i. or the ntsb. >> rick: hank hughes is one of several former crash investigators taking part in a new documentary calling the official finding the flawed and driven by agenda, claiming a massive cover-up for unknown reasons. the film makers say the evidence shows there was an external explosion, likely caused by a missile. >> this documentary presents the facts that disproves the official theory and proves beyond any reasonable doubt, that a detonation caused this crash. hard radar evidence proving that. >> there is no reason to cover up anything. >> jim, who headed the f.b.i.'s new york office at the
people too. aldridge haynes and hanson. one in the cia, one with the fbi. being a career officer or agent doesn't necessarily mean you're not going to damage the united states. but everybody ought to be subjected to very serious background investigations and clearance procedures, and whether they're career or noncareer, they should. be violating their oath of office tharand their obligation with security clearance. >> given the fact that they should not violate this almost sacred trust, how are you reacting to the fact that edward snowden, the whistle blower, has substantial support among a pretty good -- pretty hefty hunk of the american people? >> i think it's good that the majority of the american people are not willing because i think the people who support him are quite misguided. >> any members of congress believe the fourth amendment is being tram pbled on, unwarranted or illegal search and seizure, that because of the enormous capabilities we have now, the government can find out anything they want to know about you at any time, they worry that you have a bureaucracy out of contro
of the fbi. christian ahman pour has covered every major incident for the last 25 years. jeffrey tuben's title speaks for itself. this whole thing is surreal. what do you make of it at this point? >> well, i make of it, that it's made a better story than we would have seen in a book or a movie for all its unlikely characters. and it's near comical twists and turns. if it wasn't regarded so seriously. i think they are burning up the phone lines from the department of justice, from the state department, from moscow calling in every chip, every favor. every plea they can make, which is really counter intuitive, anderson, what they're saying is hold on to him, don't let him get on a plane, and figure out a way to give him back to us you have a u.s. intelligence officer with a bag full of top secret materials. right now they're saying, let's slow this down and figure out a way to send him back to us without going somewhere else. >> we've learned that the head of the fbi has called his counterpart in moscow about this, what does a conversation like that sound like? >> well, they've had a reg
of the fbi. christiane amanpour has covered every major incident for the last 25 years. jeffrey tooben's title speaks for itself. this whole thing is surreal. what do you make of it at this point? >> well, i make of it, that it's made a better story than we would have seen in a book or a movie for all its unlikely characters. and it's near comical twists and turns. if it wasn't regarded so seriously. i think they are burning up the phone lines from the department of justice, from the state department, from moscow calling in every chip, every favor. every plea they can make, which is really counter intuitive, anderson, what they're saying is hold on to him, don't let him get on a plane, and figure out a way to give him back to us you have a u.s. intelligence officer with a bag full of top secret materials. right now they're saying, let's slow this down and figure out a way to send him back to us without going somewhere else. >> we've learned that the head of the fbi has called his counterpart in moscow about this, what does a conversation like that sound like? >> well, they've had a reg
. that was dangerously close to libel. our top story, last week weld y told you about the coming man who says an fbi faces ofe globalism was offensive to muslims. tonight kind of joke we won't be hearing during tonight's show. and taco bell tests new branding for its product replacing the word neat with protein as in, man, that taco bell protein just made me sick. >> thank you. it will be a challenge doing this anthony wiener segment sense we have paul mccurio. >> i know. it is never going to happen of. >> it is not going to happen. it will go to predictable, stupid puns. >> we can drop those out and it will be like he was never on the show. >> and it will be three minutes and we will have to put stuff in there like a funny comedian. >> do you want to help here? >> we will welcome the guests no i. lets -- now. let's go. >> her day job is getting bad men off. and at night the same thing. i am here with defense attorney remi spencer. you look delightful. and he is one of the greater comics of his generation. but bill cosby was busy so we got this guy, paul mccurio. and join the dozens of fans who chec
president putin's comments he would look to see a resolution while he was in finland, erin, he suggested fbi director, mueller may have a discussion to discuss legal issues around it. the first time he suggested it. although, although, we should underscore this, russia holding the position they dent want to extradite this person to the united states, up less they see formal charges. so far they're not charges they think should be amrid pplied to that wants extradition. >> reporting from the main airport, outside moscow. where at least according to our understanding and what president putin its where edward snowden is still holed up. 72 hours after landing in russia. and "outfront" author of foreign policies national securities letter, the situation report. gordon, great to have you on. putin said today about snowden, quote the president, the sooner he selects his final destination point the better for us and himself. again that sound like i want him out of my hair. not that i will hand him over. a senior obama administration official called putin's, comments, potentially positive. i want to
? >> and does the fbi own or currently use drones and if so, for what purpose? >> yes, and for surveillance. >> talk about shock and a we. fbi using drones to spy on americans. now the governor weighs in and reaction from my shocking
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